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 Tel: +44(0)20 7292 9900       Email: info@sequoialondon.com
 

Beauty is in the Eye of the Beholder

February 22, 2017

Art is subjective to its observer. Whether it evokes a memory or sensation from a certain time and place, or the mood it stimulates for the admirer – art is an incredibly personal subject. Be it a sculpture, sketch or an oil painting; selecting art can be a lengthy process. When searching for the right pieces for your home, you have to ask the question ‘can I live with this every day?’ It may contain your favourite colour, but is it too bold, that you tire of looking at it every time you sit in the Dining Room or walk past it in the Entrance Hall? Or is it so substantial in size that you will regret committing so much space to it in your Reception Room? These things should be considered, because the wrong decision can be made very quickly, after initially falling in love with something; but it is always wise to take a step back to reassess the subject in its entirety.

 

Styles of art vary considerably; like music, it reaches out to a wide audience. At Sequoia London we are fans of everything from Renaissance to Pop Art; and one genre we particularly admire is Modern Asian Art. There tends to be an element of serenity and sometimes whimsicalness; which can be materialised in many different forms, such as, as an intricate screen or an abstract lithograph.

 

A firm favourite is the works of Japanese artist Shinoda Toko. By combining the use of calligraphy and abstract expressionism, she creates the most wonderful pieces that subtly commands attention. Shinoda Toko and many other artists are represented by Kamal Bakhshi Modern Asian Art www.kamalbakhshi.co.uk which is the go-to place for the design team when sourcing art for Clients who don’t quite know what they want; with the view to inspire them and introduce them to something, which they may not otherwise would have considered.

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘Wind from the Sea’ by Shinoda Toko

 

Image courtesy of

www.kamalbakhshi.co.uk

 

 

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